I’ve just achieved the MCSD App Builder certification

In the previous days, I’ve received confirmation that I achieved the new certification

MCSD App Builder-logo-Blk

Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer: App Builder  it validates that you have the skills needed to build modern mobile and/or web applications and services.

The exams required are fully explained on the certification website: interestingly, the new MCSA (Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate) path is now a mandatory step for earning the MCSD and can be chosen between Web Applications and Universal Windows Platform.

valuable post in the “Born to Learn” site describes the changes and the transition options available from the existing MCSD.

The new certifications will not have an expiry date, and there will be the possibility to re-earn them by passing every year an additional exam taken from a list of electives.

 

XAML Behaviors, Windows 10 UWP and Open-Source

I’ve always been a great fan of XAML Behaviors: they help following good coding practices and keeping separation of concerns in your code. Ah, did I also mention that they help to write elegant code? 😉

Good news is that XAML Behaviors have been Open-Sourced and are available for download and contributions on GitHub: more information available in the official announcement here.

I already had fun submitting a couple of Pull Requests: head over to GitHub and enjoy!

NDepend v6 available

Version 6 of NDepend is now available for download from the official site.

New features include:

  • enhanced Visual Studio integration;
  • support for Visual Studio 2015;
  • rule files shareable amongst projects;
  • default rules description and HowToFix;
  • default rules less false positives;
  • colored code metric view;
  • intuitive display of code coverage percentage;
  • compiler generated code removal;
  • async support;
  • analysis enhancements;
  • support for Visual Studio Blue, Dark, Light themes;
  • support for high DPI resolution;
  • integration with TFS, SonarQube and TeamCity.

A detailed description of the new capabilities is available here.

Cordova Windows Store apps and certificate expired error

I was updating TypedMVVM to the latest Visual Studio 2013 Update 4 and Cordova tools (using the new free Community Edition) and trying to deploy the sample to the Windows 8 emulator when I received the following

error APPX0108: The certificate specified has expired

As pointed here by Microsoft Open Technologies, the certificate available in the Visual Studio template has just expired and is not possible to deploy Windows Store apps using the old one.

To solve this problem I’ve then downloaded from here the updated certificate and copied to the following location inside the Visual Studio project:

res/native/windows/CordovaApp_TemporaryKey.pfx

The updated code is available for download on CodePlex.

TypedMVVM: Samples updated for Apache Cordova

I’ve recently installed the Multi-Device Hybrid Apps template on Visual Studio in order to try out the development of native mobile applications (targeting Android, iOS, Windows Store and Windows Phone) using HTML, CSS and JavaScript using the Apache Cordova framework.

As a first example, I decided to reuse all the TypeScript code available in my library TypedMVVM available on CodePlex.

The process was very simple and didn’t take long: I was able to quickly create a basic “Hello World” application successfully deployed on the Ripple – Nexus 7 Android emulator

TypedMVVM_Cordova

As usual, the updated code is available for download on Codeplex.

Universal Windows Apps, WinJS and TypedMVVM: samples updated to target Windows Phone and Windows Store apps

I’ve just returned from the Build 2014 conference in San Francisco where I had the opportunity to attend several interesting sessions about new developments in the Microsoft space.

One of the “big news” has been the introduction of the concept of “Universal Windows Apps“, a great way to share code between different platforms including (but not limited to) Windows Phone, Windows Store and Xbox One apps.

I decided to test this new feature on TypedMVVM, one of my “pet projects” which I made available on CodePlex some time ago. The project was originally using a simple MVVM infrastructure targeting Windows Store apps using WinJS and TypeScript so it was an ideal candidate for adding a Windows Phone 8.1 target reusing all the existing code.

The migration to Universal Apps was really straightforward: I was able to have the samples up and running in my emulator and devices while waiting at the airport in San Francisco.

TypedMVVMWindowsPhoneSample

TypedMVVMWindows81Sample

I’ve uploaded all the source code on Codeplex here, feel free to grab and give it a try.

Happy universal coding everyone! 🙂

NDepend v5.0 available

I’ve just received my copy of NDepend v5.0: this new version adds several great features to the product including

  • Support for Visual Studio 2013 (yeah!)
  • New Dashboard Panel
  • Focusing on Recent Rules violation
  • UI Enhancements
  • Trend Monitoring
  • Churning Rules and Queries
  • Report Enhancements

Click here to read a detailed description of the new capabilities and access the download links (14 days trial available).

Happy coding!

NDepend v4.1 adds CQLinq killer feature and support for Windows Store apps

I already blogged about NDepend basic features here: I was positively impressed by the capabilities of this tool by fellow MVP Patrick Smacchia.

NDepend permits you to examine .NET projects and highlight different metrics in the code in order to better analyse what areas of your solution needs refactoring for improving performance, code maintainability, application stability and applying best coding practices (just to name a few).

Some features, already available in the previous versions of NDepend, include tools for visually representing dependencies between classes, defining custom rules on code, explore code diffs and analyse code coverage. These ones are particularly helpful when the size of the project grows: a visual representation helps the developer to better identify areas that needs more work (and then save development time).

Recently Patrick contacted me for highlighting the new features available in NDepend v4.1. I was very pleased to find support for Windows Store apps but another capability got immediately my attention: CQLinq.

This is a killer feature: CQLinq (acronym for Code Query LINQ) enables the developer “to query the code” for retrieving information about it. Some simple examples of queries could be:

  • find me the methods too big / too complex;
  • find the methods added but poorly covered by tests;
  • get information about naming conventions;
  • any other query you like: the possibilities are not limited at all!

Technically these queries can be constructed using the traditional LINQ syntax and the types defined in the NDepend.CoreModel of the NDepend API.

The best place to start using CQLinq is here by exploring the dedicated section on the site which contains a ton of different examples to start: I recommend to try and run the available samples which are an excellent starting point and then modifying them for custom queries.

I’ve been really impressed by CQLinq and I can’t wait to use it on real projects to enhance the quality of the code and then reduce the time needed for new implementations.

Happy coding everyone!

MultiTouch Behaviors available on NuGet

I’ve received several requests for publishing the MultiTouch Behaviors on the NuGet gallery so I created a simple package containing support for the Windows Phone and Silverlight platforms.

To enable your project for MultiTouch, just run the following command in the Package Manager Console and all the libraries and dependencies will be added to the Visual Studio project:

PM> Install-Package MultiTouchBehaviors

Alternatively just search for the package selecting Tools->Library Package Manager->Manage NuGet Packages for Solution from Visual Studio 2012.

If you are interested in creating a NuGet package for your open-source project, register an account here in the gallery and follow the instructions described in the section “Creating and Publishing a Package“: they are very clear and contain detailed information about the process.

The package definition for MultiTouch is also available in the Source Code section on CodePlex.

Happy Coding!

Microsoft Patterns & Practices: Prism for the Windows Runtime – My favourite resources

As you may know, the Microsoft Patterns & Practices team has recently released the final version of  “Prism for Windows Runtime“, available for download here on CodePlex.

Prism for Windows Runtime

This project contains a complete guidance for building Windows Store apps using C# and XAML and includes the following resources:

Big kudos to all the p & p team: they did an amazing job and I personally felt honored to have the possibility of providing feedback whilst the project was in development.

This is really a great guidance for building Windows Store applications that can be easily tested, maintained and extended: every developer building complex apps will benefit from it.

Other useful links:

Happy coding everyone!